• Writ Writ

    Writ is the one fundamental right of supreme Court In common law, a writ Anglo-Saxon gewrit, Latin breve is a formal written order issued by a body with admi...

  • Ultimogeniture Ultimogeniture

    Ultimogeniture, also known as postremogeniture or junior right, is the tradition of inheritance by the last-born of a privileged position in a parents wealth...

  • Trial by ordeal Trial by ordeal

    Trial by ordeal was an ancient judicial practice by which the guilt or innocence of the accused was determined by subjecting them to a painful, or at least a...

  • Tenement (law) Tenement (law)

    A tenement, in law, is anything that is held, rather than owned. This usage is a holdover from feudalism, which still forms the basis of all real-estate law ...

  • Sumptuary law Sumptuary law

    Sumptuary laws are laws that try to regulate consumption. Blacks Law Dictionary defines them as "Laws made for the purpose of restraining luxury or extravaga...

  • Simony Simony

    Simony is the act of selling church offices and roles or sacred things. It is named after Simon Magus, who is described in the Acts of the Apostles as having...

  • Section 377 Section 377

    Section 377 of the penal code in 41 former British colonies criminalizes all" unnatural” sexual acts including anal sex between men and other homosexual acts...

  • Rogatio Rogatio

    See Rogation days for usage pertaining to the Christian calendar of the Western Church. In Roman constitutional law, rogatio is the term for a legislative bi...

  • Reception statute Reception statute

    A reception statute is a statutory law adopted as a former British colony becomes independent by which the new nation adopts, or receives, the English common...

  • Proximity of blood Proximity of blood

    Proximity of blood, or proximity by degree of kinship, is one of the ways to determine hereditary succession based on genealogy. In effect, the application o...

  • Privilege (law) Privilege (law)

    A privilege is a certain entitlement to immunity granted by the state or another authority to a restricted group, either by birth or on a conditional basis. ...

  • Private jurisdiction Private jurisdiction

    Private jurisdiction is the right of an individual or a legal entity to establish courts of law. It was prevalent during feudalism. A franchise, such as a co...

  • Printing patent Printing patent

    The printing patent or printing privilege was a precursor of modern copyright. It was an exclusive right to print a work or a class of works. The earliest re...

  • Primogeniture Primogeniture

    Primogeniture is the right, by law or custom, of the firstborn legitimate son to inherit his parents entire or main estate in preference to shared inheritanc...

  • Posse comitatus Posse comitatus

    The posse comitatus, in common law, is a group of people mobilized by the conservator of peace – typically a sheriff – to suppress lawlessness or defend the ...

  • Paraphernalia Paraphernalia

    Paraphernalia most commonly refers to a group of apparatus, equipment, or furnishing used for a particular activity. For example, an avid sports fan may cove...

  • Oral law Oral law

    An oral law is a code of conduct in use in a given culture, religion or community application, by which a body of rules of human behaviour is transmitted by ...

  • Oath Oath

    Traditionally an oath is either a statement of fact or a promise with wording relating to something considered sacred as a sign of verity. A common legal sub...

  • Mechanisms of the English common law Mechanisms of the English common law

    According to Montesquieu, it is Parliament that has the rightful power to legislate, not the judiciary. The legal fiction is that judges do not make law, the...

  • List of monarchies by order of succession List of monarchies by order of succession

  • Legal humanists Legal humanists

    The legal humanists were a group of scholars of Roman law, which arose in Italy during the Renaissance with the works of Lorenzo Valla and Andrea Alciato as ...

  • Law and History Review Law and History Review

    Law and History Review is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal covering legal history. It was established in 1983 and is published by Cambridge Univers...

  • Law of Jersey Law of Jersey

    The law of Jersey has been influenced by several different legal traditions, in particular Norman customary law, English common law and modern French civil l...

  • Intestacy Intestacy

    Intestacy is the condition of the estate of a person who dies without having in force a valid will or other binding declaration. Alternatively this may also ...

  • History of the legal profession History of the legal profession

    The legal profession has its origins in ancient Greece and Rome. Although in Greece it was forbidden to take payment for pleading the cause of another, the r...

  • Grazing rights Grazing rights

    Grazing rights have never been codified in United States law, because such common-law rights derive from the English concept of the commons, a piece of land ...

  • Glossator Glossator

    The scholars of the 11th and 12th century legal schools in Italy, France and Germany are identified as glossators in a specific sense. They studied Roman law...

  • Feoffment Feoffment

    In the Middle Ages, especially under the European feudal system, feoffment or enfeoffment was the deed by which a person was given land in exchange for a ple...

  • Fee tail Fee tail

    In English common law, fee tail or entail is a form of trust established by deed or settlement which restricts the sale or inheritance of an estate in real p...

  • Execution by elephant Execution by elephant

    Execution by elephant was a common method of capital punishment in South and Southeast Asia, particularly in India, where Asian elephants were used to crush,...

  • Ejectment Ejectment

    Ejectment is a common law term for civil action to recover the possession of or title to land. It replaced the old real actions and the various possessory as...

  • Debtors' prison Debtors' prison

    A debtors prison is a prison for people who are unable to pay debt. Through the mid-19th century, debtors prisons were a common way to deal with unpaid debt ...

  • Death by a Thousand Cuts (book) Death by a Thousand Cuts (book)

    Death by a Thousand Cuts is a book by the historians Timothy Brook and Gregory Blue and scientific researcher Jerome Bourgon which examines the use of slow s...

  • Dancing ban Dancing ban

    Dancing bans are legal or religious prohibitions against dancing, which have been applied at various times in various jurisdictions around the world. Even mo...

  • Condaghe Condaghe

    A condaghe, from the medieval Sardinian term kondake, was a kind of administrative document used in the Sardinian judicates between the 11th and 13th centuri...

  • Common law Common law

    Common law is the body of law derived from judicial decisions of courts and similar tribunals. The defining characteristic of "common law" is that it arises ...

  • Common land Common land

    Common land is land owned collectively by a number of persons, or by one person, but over which other people have certain traditional rights, such as to allo...

  • Common informer Common informer

  • Chinese law Chinese law

    Chinese law is one of the oldest legal traditions in the world. The core of modern Chinese law is based on Germanic-style civil law, socialist law, and tradi...

  • Byzantine law Byzantine law

    Byzantine law was essentially a continuation of Roman law with increased Christian influence. Most sources define Byzantine law as the Roman legal traditions...

  • Brocard (law) Brocard (law)

    A brocard is a legal maxim in Latin that is, in a strict sense, derived from traditional legal authorities, even from ancient Rome. The word is a variant of ...

  • American Society for Legal History American Society for Legal History

    The American Society for Legal History is a learned society dedicated to promoting scholarship and teaching in the field of legal history. It was founded in ...

Legal history

Legal history or the history of law is the study of how law has evolved and why it changed. Legal history is closely connected to the development of civilisations
The American Journal of Legal History is a peer reviewed, peer edited legal periodical. It has appeared quarterly since 1957. It was the first English - language
In 1931 the first supreme court was established. Though the contemporary legal system and laws have no direct links to traditional Chinese law, their impact
Malaysian legal history has been determined by events spanning a period of some six hundred years. Of these, three major periods were largely responsible
The legal history of the Catholic Church is the history of the oldest continuously functioning legal system in the West, much later than Roman law but
Wills have a lengthy history The Ancient Greek practice concerning wills was not the same in all places some states permitted men to dispose of their
American Society for Legal History is a learned society dedicated to promoting scholarship and teaching in the field of legal history It was founded in
Gruyter. pp. 497 ISBN 978 - 3 - 11 - 081206 - 0. Hathaway, Andrew 2009 The Legal History and Cultural Experience of Cannabis Here to Help. Here to Help. Retrieved
The Chief Sources of English Legal History is a book written by Percy Henry Winfield and published, with an introduction by Roscoe Pound, by Harvard University
Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund, better known as Lambda Legal is an American civil rights organization that focuses on lesbian, gay, bisexual
A legal periodical is a periodical about law. Legal periodicals include legal newspapers, law reviews, periodicals published by way of commerce, periodicals
The Leopold Wenger Institute for Ancient Legal History and Papyrus Research is an institute of the law school of the University of Munich. It traces itself

Law

among Scotland s early cultures to its modern role as one of the three legal jurisdictions of the United Kingdom. The various historic sources of Scots
Rechtsgeschiedenis Revue d Histoire du Droit The Legal History Review is a quarterly peer - reviewed academic journal covering legal history It was established in 1918 and
substantive legal work for which a lawyer is responsible. Bullying in the legal profession History of the legal profession History of the American legal profession
Legal anthropology, also known as the anthropology of laws, is a sub - discipline of anthropology which specializes in the cross - cultural study of social
The Max Planck Institute for European Legal History German: Max - Planck - Institut fur europaische Rechtsgeschichte situated in Frankfurt Main, is one
Professor Barbara Babcock and her students, have created a Women s Legal History Biography Project website as a resource for all who are interested in
Legal aid is the provision of assistance to people who are unable to afford legal representation and access to the court system. Legal aid is regarded
The legal rights of women refers to the social and human rights of women. One of the first women s rights declarations was the Declaration of Sentiments
In law, a legal person is any person or thing less ambiguously, any legal entity that can do the things an everyday person can usually do in law
series of legal thriller adventure video games. Robinson, Marlyn 1998 Collins to Grisham: A Brief History of the Legal Thriller PDF Legal Studies

be analysis or study of the meaning of legal concepts is worthwhile and is to be distinguished from history or sociology of law, as well as from criticism
Law and History Review is a quarterly peer - reviewed academic journal covering legal history It was established in 1983 and is published by Cambridge
Legal tender is a medium of payment recognized by a legal system to be valid for meeting a financial obligation. Each jurisdiction determines what is
Critical legal studies CLS is a school of critical theory that first emerged as a movement in the United States during the 1970s. Critical Legal Studies
Legal bibliography is the bibliography of law. The term has been applied to the kinds and functions of legal materials and to lists of law books and
attorneys fees or other legal costs in a number of ways. Defendants can pay with their own money, through legal defense funds, or legal financing companies
religious law or combinations of these. However, the legal system of each country is shaped by its unique history and so incorporates individual variations. The
A legal drama, or a courtroom drama, is a genre of film and television that generally focuses on narratives regarding legal practice and the justice system

American Society for Legal History

The American Society for Legal History is a learned society dedicated to promoting scholarship and teaching in the field of legal history. It was founded in ...

Antejuramentum

Antejuramentum, and præjuramentum, historically called juramentum calumniæ, is an oath which both the accuser and accused were obliged to make before any tri...

Bill of attainder

A bill of attainder is an act of a legislature declaring a person or group of persons guilty of some crime and punishing them, often without a trial. As with...

Brocard (law)

A brocard is a legal maxim in Latin that is, in a strict sense, derived from traditional legal authorities, even from ancient Rome. The word is a variant of ...

Byzantine law

Byzantine law was essentially a continuation of Roman law with increased Christian influence. Most sources define Byzantine law as the Roman legal traditions...

Legal history of the Catholic Church

The legal history of the Catholic Church is the history of the oldest continuously functioning legal system in the West, much later than Roman law but predat...

Chinese law

Chinese law is one of the oldest legal traditions in the world. The core of modern Chinese law is based on Germanic-style civil law, socialist law, and tradi...

Common informer

Common land

Common land is land owned collectively by a number of persons, or by one person, but over which other people have certain traditional rights, such as to allo...

Common law

Common law is the body of law derived from judicial decisions of courts and similar tribunals. The defining characteristic of "common law" is that it arises ...

Compurgation

Compurgation, also called wager of law and oath-helping, was a defence used primarily in medieval law. A defendant could establish his innocence or nonliabil...

Condaghe

A condaghe, from the medieval Sardinian term kondake, was a kind of administrative document used in the Sardinian judicates between the 11th and 13th centuri...

Crime against nature

The crime against nature or unnatural act has historically been a legal term in English-speaking states identifying forms of sexual behavior not considered n...

Dancing ban

Dancing bans are legal or religious prohibitions against dancing, which have been applied at various times in various jurisdictions around the world. Even mo...

Death by a Thousand Cuts (book)

Death by a Thousand Cuts is a book by the historians Timothy Brook and Gregory Blue and scientific researcher Jerome Bourgon which examines the use of slow s...

Debtors' prison

A debtors prison is a prison for people who are unable to pay debt. Through the mid-19th century, debtors prisons were a common way to deal with unpaid debt ...

Dhammasattha

Dhammasattha "treatise on the law" is the Pali name of a genre of literature found in the Indianized kingdoms of Western mainland Southeast Asia principally ...

Dishu system

Dishu was an important legal and moral system involving marriage and inheritance in ancient China. In pre-modern eras, upper-class men in ancient China, Kore...

Megullia Dotata

Megullia is one of the one hundred and six subjects of Giovanni Boccaccio’s On Famous Women De mulieribus claris, 1362. She is famous as Boccaccio says "more...

Ejectment

Ejectment is a common law term for civil action to recover the possession of or title to land. It replaced the old real actions and the various possessory as...

Execution by elephant

Execution by elephant was a common method of capital punishment in South and Southeast Asia, particularly in India, where Asian elephants were used to crush,...

Fee tail

In English common law, fee tail or entail is a form of trust established by deed or settlement which restricts the sale or inheritance of an estate in real p...

Feoffment

In the Middle Ages, especially under the European feudal system, feoffment or enfeoffment was the deed by which a person was given land in exchange for a ple...

Glossator

The scholars of the 11th and 12th century legal schools in Italy, France and Germany are identified as glossators in a specific sense. They studied Roman law...

Grazing rights

Grazing rights have never been codified in United States law, because such common-law rights derive from the English concept of the commons, a piece of land ...

History of the American legal profession

The History of the American legal profession covers the work, training, and professional activities of lawyers from the colonial era to the present. Lawyers ...

History of the legal profession

The legal profession has its origins in ancient Greece and Rome. Although in Greece it was forbidden to take payment for pleading the cause of another, the r...

Intestacy

Intestacy is the condition of the estate of a person who dies without having in force a valid will or other binding declaration. Alternatively this may also ...

Law of Jersey

The law of Jersey has been influenced by several different legal traditions, in particular Norman customary law, English common law and modern French civil l...

Jus commune

Jus commune or ius commune is Latin for "common law" in certain jurisdictions. It is often used by civil law jurists to refer to those aspects of the civil l...

Law and History Review

Law and History Review is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal covering legal history. It was established in 1983 and is published by Cambridge Univers...

Legal humanists

The legal humanists were a group of scholars of Roman law, which arose in Italy during the Renaissance with the works of Lorenzo Valla and Andrea Alciato as ...

Legist

A Legist, from the Latin lex law, is any expert or student of law. It was especially used since the Carolingian dynasty for royal councillors who advised the...

Leopold Wenger Institute for Ancient Legal History and Papyrus Research

The Leopold Wenger Institute for Ancient Legal History and Papyrus Research is an institute of the law school of the University of Munich. It traces itself b...

Mechanisms of the English common law

According to Montesquieu, it is Parliament that has the rightful power to legislate, not the judiciary. The legal fiction is that judges do not make law, the...

Mischief rule

The mischief rule is one of three rules of statutory interpretation traditionally applied by English courts. The other two are the "plain meaning rule" and t...

Oath

Traditionally an oath is either a statement of fact or a promise with wording relating to something considered sacred as a sign of verity. A common legal sub...

Oral law

An oral law is a code of conduct in use in a given culture, religion or community application, by which a body of rules of human behaviour is transmitted by ...

Paraphernalia

Paraphernalia most commonly refers to a group of apparatus, equipment, or furnishing used for a particular activity. For example, an avid sports fan may cove...

Porphyrogeniture

Porphyrogeniture, also sometimes referred to as born to the purple, is a system of political succession that favours the rights of sons born after their fath...

Posse comitatus

The posse comitatus, in common law, is a group of people mobilized by the conservator of peace – typically a sheriff – to suppress lawlessness or defend the ...

Pragmatic sanction

A pragmatic sanction is a sovereigns solemn decree on a matter of primary importance and has the force of fundamental law. In the late history of the Holy Ro...

Primogeniture

Primogeniture is the right, by law or custom, of the firstborn legitimate son to inherit his parents entire or main estate in preference to shared inheritanc...

Printing patent

The printing patent or printing privilege was a precursor of modern copyright. It was an exclusive right to print a work or a class of works. The earliest re...

Private jurisdiction

Private jurisdiction is the right of an individual or a legal entity to establish courts of law. It was prevalent during feudalism. A franchise, such as a co...

Privilege (law)

A privilege is a certain entitlement to immunity granted by the state or another authority to a restricted group, either by birth or on a conditional basis. ...

Proximity of blood

Proximity of blood, or proximity by degree of kinship, is one of the ways to determine hereditary succession based on genealogy. In effect, the application o...

Reception statute

A reception statute is a statutory law adopted as a former British colony becomes independent by which the new nation adopts, or receives, the English common...

Rogatio

See Rogation days for usage pertaining to the Christian calendar of the Western Church. In Roman constitutional law, rogatio is the term for a legislative bi...

Section 377

Section 377 of the penal code in 41 former British colonies criminalizes all" unnatural” sexual acts including anal sex between men and other homosexual acts...

Seduction (tort)

The tort of seduction was a civil wrong or tort in common law legal systems, and still exists in some jurisdictions. An unmarried woman could sue on the grou...

Simony

Simony is the act of selling church offices and roles or sacred things. It is named after Simon Magus, who is described in the Acts of the Apostles as having...

Society of Gentleman Practisers in the Courts of Law and Equity

The Society of Gentleman Practisers in the Courts of Law and Equity was an 18th-century professional society for attorneys and solicitors in England and Wale...

Sumptuary law

Sumptuary laws are laws that try to regulate consumption. Blacks Law Dictionary defines them as "Laws made for the purpose of restraining luxury or extravaga...

Supplementary process

Supplementary process is a method of debt collection where the debtor who has a court money judgement against him is brought into court, "requiring the judgm...

Tenement (law)

A tenement, in law, is anything that is held, rather than owned. This usage is a holdover from feudalism, which still forms the basis of all real-estate law ...

Trial by ordeal

Trial by ordeal was an ancient judicial practice by which the guilt or innocence of the accused was determined by subjecting them to a painful, or at least a...

Ultimogeniture

Ultimogeniture, also known as postremogeniture or junior right, is the tradition of inheritance by the last-born of a privileged position in a parents wealth...

Writ

Writ is the one fundamental right of supreme Court In common law, a writ Anglo-Saxon gewrit, Latin breve is a formal written order issued by a body with admi...