• Self-authenticating document Self-authenticating document

    A self-authenticating document, under the law of evidence in the United States, is any document that can be admitted into evidence at a trial without proof b...

  • Search and seizure Search and seizure

    Search and Seizure is a procedure used in many civil law and common law legal systems by which police or other authorities and their agents, who, suspecting ...

  • Request for admissions Request for admissions

    A request for admissions are a set of statements sent from one litigant to an adversary, for the purpose of having the adversary admit or deny the statements...

  • Relevance (law) Relevance (law)

    Relevance, in the common law of evidence, is the tendency of a given item of evidence to prove or disprove one of the legal elements of the case, or to have ...

  • Real evidence Real evidence

    Physical evidence is any material object that plays some role in the matter that gave rise to the litigation, introduced as evidence in a judicial proceeding...

  • Question of fact Question of fact

  • Public-interest immunity Public-interest immunity

    Public-interest immunity, previously known as Crown privilege, is a principle of English common law under which the English courts can grant a court order al...

  • The Public Prosecution Service v William Elliott, Robert McKee The Public Prosecution Service v William Elliott, Robert McKee

    The Public Prosecution Service v William Elliott and Robert McKee UKSC 32 is a case decided by the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom concerning admissibili...

  • Outline of evidence law in the United States Outline of evidence law in the United States

    The following outline of evidence law in the United States sets forth the areas of contention that generally arise in the presentation of evidence in trial p...

  • Opinion evidence Opinion evidence

    Opinion evidence refers to evidence of what the witness thinks, believes, or infers in regard to facts, as distinguished from personal knowledge of the facts...

  • Material witness Material witness

    A material witness is a person with information alleged to be material concerning a criminal proceeding. The authority to detain material witnesses dates to ...

  • Lies (evidence) Lies (evidence)

    A lie is a statement used intentionally for the purpose of deception. The practice of communicating a lie is called lying ; a person who communicates a lie m...

  • Justice and Security Act 2013 Justice and Security Act 2013

    The Justice and Security Act 2013 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, firstly to provide for oversight of the Security Service, the Secret Int...

  • Interrogatories Interrogatories

    In law, interrogatories are a formal set of written questions propounded by one litigant and required to be answered by an adversary in order to clarify matt...

  • Indian Evidence Act Indian Evidence Act

    The Indian Evidence Act, originally passed in India by the Imperial Legislative Council in 1872, during the British Raj, contains a set of rules and allied i...

  • Implied assertion Implied assertion

    In the law of evidence, an implied assertion is a statement or conduct that implies a side issue surrounding certain admissible facts which have not necessar...

  • Hostile witness Hostile witness

    A hostile witness, otherwise known as an adverse witness or an unfavorable witness, is a witness at trial whose testimony on direct examination is either ope...

  • Habit evidence Habit evidence

    Habit evidence is a term used in the law of evidence in the United States to describe any evidence submitted for the purpose of proving that a person acted i...

  • Foundation (evidence) Foundation (evidence)

    In common law, a foundation is sufficient preliminary evidence of the authenticity and relevance for the admission of material evidence in the form of exhibi...

  • Expert witnesses in English law Expert witnesses in English law

    The role of expert witnesses in English law is to give explanations of difficult or technical topics in civil and criminal trials, to assist the fact finding...

  • Expert witness Expert witness

    An expert witness, in England, Wales and the United States, is a person whose opinion by virtue of education, training, certification, skills or experience, ...

  • Exhibit (legal) Exhibit (legal)

    An exhibit, in a criminal prosecution or a civil trial, is physical or documentary evidence brought before the jury. The artifact or document itself is prese...

  • Evidence Regulation Evidence Regulation

    Council Regulation No. 1206/2001 of 28 May 2001 on cooperation between the courts of the Member States in the taking of evidence in civil or commercial matte...

  • Evidence management Evidence management

    Evidence management is the administration and control of evidence related to an event so that it can be used to prove the circumstances of the event, and so ...

  • Evidence Act 2006 Evidence Act 2006

    The Evidence Act 2006 is an Act of the Parliament of New Zealand that codifies the laws of evidence. When enacted, the Act drew together the common law and s...

  • Documentary evidence Documentary evidence

    Documentary evidence is any evidence that is, or can be, introduced at a trial in the form of documents, as distinguished from oral testimony. Documentary ev...

  • Document dump Document dump

    A document dump is the act of responding to an adversarys request for information by presenting the adversary with a large quantity of data that is transferr...

  • Conduct money Conduct money

    Conduct money is money paid in some legal systems to a person under the compulsion of a summons to witness to pay for their expenses to attend in court. It g...

  • Circumstantial evidence Circumstantial evidence

    Circumstantial evidence is evidence that relies on an inference to connect it to a conclusion of fact - such as a fingerprint at the scene of a crime. By con...

  • Character evidence Character evidence

    Character evidence is a term used in the law of evidence to describe any testimony or document submitted for the purpose of proving that a person acted in a ...

  • Casket letters Casket letters

    The Casket letters were eight letters and some sonnets said to have been written by Mary, Queen of Scots, to the Earl of Bothwell, between January and April ...

  • Canada Evidence Act Canada Evidence Act

    The Canada Evidence Act is an Act of the Parliament of Canada, first passed in 1893, that regulates the rules of evidence in court proceedings under federal ...

  • Best evidence rule Best evidence rule

    The best evidence rule is a legal principle that holds an original copy of a document as superior evidence. The rule specifies that secondary evidence, such ...

  • Balancing test Balancing test

    A balancing test is any judicial test in which the jurists weigh the importance of multiple factors in a legal case. Proponents of such tests argue that they...

  • Bad character evidence Bad character evidence

    The Criminal Justice Act 2003 applicable in England and Wales, and to a lesser extent Scotland and Northern Ireland, implemented fundamental changes to the a...

  • Authentication (law) Authentication (law)

    Authentication, in the law of evidence, is the process by which documentary evidence and other physical evidence is proven to be genuine, and not a forgery. ...

  • Argumentative Argumentative

    In the American legal system, argumentative is an evidentiary objection raised in response to a question which prompts a witness to draw inferences from fact...

  • Ancient document Ancient document

    An ancient document, in the law of evidence, refers to both a means of authentication for a piece of documentary evidence, and an exception to the hearsay rule.

  • Affidavit Affidavit

    An affidavit AF -i- DAY -vit ; Medieval Latin for he has declared under oath) is a written sworn statement of fact which is voluntarily made by an affiant or...

  • Admission (law) Admission (law)

    An admission in the law of evidence is a prior statement by an adverse party which can be admitted into evidence over a hearsay objection. In general, admiss...

  • Evidence (law) Evidence (law)

    The law of evidence, also known as the rules of evidence, encompasses the rules and legal principles that govern the proof of facts in a legal proceeding. Th...

Evidence law

The law of evidence also known as the rules of evidence encompasses the rules and legal principles that govern the proof of facts in a legal proceeding
following outline of evidence law in the United States sets forth the areas of contention that generally arise in the presentation of evidence in trial proceedings
at common law to tamper with, conceal, or destroy evidence knowing that it may be wanted in a judicial proceeding or is being sought by law enforcement
Admissible evidence in a court of law is any testimonial, documentary, or tangible evidence that may be introduced to a factfinder - usually a judge or
Circumstantial evidence is evidence that relies on an inference to connect it to a conclusion of fact - such as a fingerprint at the scene of a crime. By
is evidence that is merely consistent with an assertion but does not rule out other, contradictory assertions, as in circumstantial evidence In law rules
False evidence fabricated evidence forged evidence or tainted evidence is information created or obtained illegally, to sway the verdict in a court case
Evidence is anything presented as proof of an assertion. Evidence may also refer to: Scientific evidence Evidence law which governs testimony and exhibits
First adopted in 1975, the Federal Rules of Evidence codify the evidence law that applies in United States federal courts. In addition, many states in
issues governing admissibility of evidence in the Indian courts of law The enactment and adoption of the Indian Evidence Act was a path - breaking judicial
law As law of evidence is largely set by common law the Act is not comprehensive. The Act applies to court proceedings conducted under federal law

The parol evidence rule is a rule in the Anglo - American common law that governs what kinds of evidence parties to a contract dispute can introduce when
Relevance, in the common law of evidence is the tendency of a given item of evidence to prove or disprove one of the legal elements of the case, or to
Unfair prejudice in United States evidence law may be grounds for excluding relevant evidence Unfair prejudice as used in Rule 403 is not to be equated
Preponderance of the evidence is also the standard of proof used in United States administrative law Preponderance of the evidence is the standard of proof
Direct evidence supports the truth of an assertion in criminal law an assertion of guilt or of innocence directly, i.e., without an intervening inference
In common law a foundation is sufficient preliminary evidence of the authenticity and relevance for the admission of material evidence in the form of
The Louisiana Code of Evidence is a code of evidence law enacted by section 1 of Act 515 of 1988, under Louisiana Civil Law The Code became effective
experimental design. In law corroboration refers to the requirement in some jurisdictions, such as in Scotland, that any evidence adduced be backed up by
Anecdotal evidence is evidence from anecdotes: evidence collected in a casual or informal manner and relying heavily or entirely on personal testimony
party. In law scientific evidence is evidence derived from scientific knowledge or techniques. Most forensic evidence including genetic evidence is scientific
Character evidence is a term used in the law of evidence to describe any testimony or document submitted for the purpose of proving that a person acted
The South African law of evidence forms part of the adjectival or procedural law of that country. It is based on English common law There is no all - embracing
Digital evidence or electronic evidence is any probative information stored or transmitted in digital form that a party to a court case may use at trial

the common law and civil law approaches to obtaining evidence and has significantly streamlined the procedures for compulsion of evidence from abroad
The use of evidence under Bayes theorem relates to the likelihood of finding evidence in relation to the accused, where Bayes theorem concerns the probability
can be obtained. The rule has its roots in 18th - century British law The best evidence rule has its origins in the 18th century case Omychund v Barker
Opinion evidence refers to evidence of what the witness thinks, believes, or infers in regard to facts, as distinguished from personal knowledge of the
interpretation of the law Such a question is distinct from a question of fact, which must be answered by reference to facts and evidence as well as inferences
of relevant evidence A closely related concept to spoliation of evidence is tampering with evidence which is usually the criminal - law version of the

Evidence (law)

The law of evidence, also known as the rules of evidence, encompasses the rules and legal principles that govern the proof of facts in a legal proceeding. Th...

Admissible evidence

Admissible evidence, in a court of law, is any testimonial, documentary, or tangible evidence that may be introduced to a factfinder - usually a judge or jur...

Admission (law)

An admission in the law of evidence is a prior statement by an adverse party which can be admitted into evidence over a hearsay objection. In general, admiss...

Affidavit

An affidavit AF -i- DAY -vit ; Medieval Latin for he has declared under oath) is a written sworn statement of fact which is voluntarily made by an affiant or...

Allocation questionnaire

An allocation questionnaire is a form used in English legal practice. After a claim is made, if a defence is filed each party is required to complete and ret...

Ancient document

An ancient document, in the law of evidence, refers to both a means of authentication for a piece of documentary evidence, and an exception to the hearsay rule.

Argumentative

In the American legal system, argumentative is an evidentiary objection raised in response to a question which prompts a witness to draw inferences from fact...

Authentication (law)

Authentication, in the law of evidence, is the process by which documentary evidence and other physical evidence is proven to be genuine, and not a forgery. ...

Bad character evidence

The Criminal Justice Act 2003 applicable in England and Wales, and to a lesser extent Scotland and Northern Ireland, implemented fundamental changes to the a...

Balancing test

A balancing test is any judicial test in which the jurists weigh the importance of multiple factors in a legal case. Proponents of such tests argue that they...

Best evidence rule

The best evidence rule is a legal principle that holds an original copy of a document as superior evidence. The rule specifies that secondary evidence, such ...

Bootstrapping (law)

The bootstrapping rule in the rules of evidence dealt with admissibility as non-hearsay of statements of conspiracy in United States federal courts. The rule...

Canada Evidence Act

The Canada Evidence Act is an Act of the Parliament of Canada, first passed in 1893, that regulates the rules of evidence in court proceedings under federal ...

Casket letters

The Casket letters were eight letters and some sonnets said to have been written by Mary, Queen of Scots, to the Earl of Bothwell, between January and April ...

Character evidence

Character evidence is a term used in the law of evidence to describe any testimony or document submitted for the purpose of proving that a person acted in a ...

Circumstantial evidence

Circumstantial evidence is evidence that relies on an inference to connect it to a conclusion of fact - such as a fingerprint at the scene of a crime. By con...

Conclusive presumption

A conclusive presumption, also known as an irrebuttable presumption, is a type of presumption used in several legal systems.

Conduct money

Conduct money is money paid in some legal systems to a person under the compulsion of a summons to witness to pay for their expenses to attend in court. It g...

Dead Man's Statute

A dead mans statute, also known as a dead man act or dead mans rule, is a statute designed to prevent perjury in a civil case by prohibiting a witness who is...

Declarant

A declarant, generally speaking, is anyone who composes and signs a statement or declaration alleging that the information he has given therein is true. This...

DNA Identification Act (Canada)

The DNA Identification Act is a Canadian law that calls for the establishment of a DNA databank and allows judges to order DNA testing for criminal suspects....

Document dump

A document dump is the act of responding to an adversarys request for information by presenting the adversary with a large quantity of data that is transferr...

Documentary evidence

Documentary evidence is any evidence that is, or can be, introduced at a trial in the form of documents, as distinguished from oral testimony. Documentary ev...

Evidence Act 2006

The Evidence Act 2006 is an Act of the Parliament of New Zealand that codifies the laws of evidence. When enacted, the Act drew together the common law and s...

Evidence management

Evidence management is the administration and control of evidence related to an event so that it can be used to prove the circumstances of the event, and so ...

Evidence Regulation

Council Regulation No. 1206/2001 of 28 May 2001 on cooperation between the courts of the Member States in the taking of evidence in civil or commercial matte...

Evidence under Bayes theorem

The use of evidence under Bayes theorem relates to the probability of finding evidence in relation to the accused, where Bayes theorem concerns the probabili...

Evidential burden

Evidential burden or "production burden" is the obligation to produce evidence to properly raise an issue at trial. Failure to satisfy the evidential burden ...

Exhibit (legal)

An exhibit, in a criminal prosecution or a civil trial, is physical or documentary evidence brought before the jury. The artifact or document itself is prese...

Expert witness

An expert witness, in England, Wales and the United States, is a person whose opinion by virtue of education, training, certification, skills or experience, ...

Expert Witness Institute

The Expert Witness Institute is a UK legal institute for expert witnesses founded by Lord Woolf, Michael Davies and other legal experts. It was incorporated ...

Expert witnesses in English law

The role of expert witnesses in English law is to give explanations of difficult or technical topics in civil and criminal trials, to assist the fact finding...

Foundation (evidence)

In common law, a foundation is sufficient preliminary evidence of the authenticity and relevance for the admission of material evidence in the form of exhibi...

Habit evidence

Habit evidence is a term used in the law of evidence in the United States to describe any evidence submitted for the purpose of proving that a person acted i...

Hostile witness

A hostile witness, otherwise known as an adverse witness or an unfavorable witness, is a witness at trial whose testimony on direct examination is either ope...

Implied assertion

In the law of evidence, an implied assertion is a statement or conduct that implies a side issue surrounding certain admissible facts which have not necessar...

Motion in limine

In U.S. law, a motion in limine is a motion, discussed outside the presence of the jury, to request that certain testimony be excluded. The motion is decided...

Incontrovertible evidence

Incontrovertible evidence is a colloquial term for evidence introduced to prove a fact that is supposed to be so conclusive that there can be no other truth ...

Indian Evidence Act

The Indian Evidence Act, originally passed in India by the Imperial Legislative Council in 1872, during the British Raj, contains a set of rules and allied i...

Interrogatories

In law, interrogatories are a formal set of written questions propounded by one litigant and required to be answered by an adversary in order to clarify matt...

Judicial notice

Judicial notice is a rule in the law of evidence that allows a fact to be introduced into evidence if the truth of that fact is so notorious or well known, o...

Justice and Security Act 2013

The Justice and Security Act 2013 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, firstly to provide for oversight of the Security Service, the Secret Int...

Learned treatise

A learned treatise, in the law of evidence, is a text that is sufficiently authoritative in its field to be admissible as evidence in a court in support of t...

Lies (evidence)

A lie is a statement used intentionally for the purpose of deception. The practice of communicating a lie is called lying ; a person who communicates a lie m...

Material witness

A material witness is a person with information alleged to be material concerning a criminal proceeding. The authority to detain material witnesses dates to ...

New York State Police Troop C scandal

The New York State Police Troop C scandal involved the fabrication of evidence by members of the New York State Police, which was used to convict suspects in...

Opinion evidence

Opinion evidence refers to evidence of what the witness thinks, believes, or infers in regard to facts, as distinguished from personal knowledge of the facts...

Outline of evidence law in the United States

The following outline of evidence law in the United States sets forth the areas of contention that generally arise in the presentation of evidence in trial p...

Presumption of advancement

The presumption of advancement is a legal presumption which arises in various common law jurisdictions in relation to the transfers of money or other propert...

Presumption of regularity

The presumption of regularity is a presumption that forms part of the law of evidence of England and Wales. It is expressed by the maxim of law omnia praesum...

Priest–penitent privilege in France

Priest–penitent privilege in France and the western portion of Europe received public recognition at a very early date owing to the perceived sacredness of t...

Proffer

For the agreement between prosecutor and defendant, see proffer letter. A proffer is an offer made prior to any formal negotiations. In a trial, to proffer s...

The Public Prosecution Service v William Elliott, Robert McKee

The Public Prosecution Service v William Elliott and Robert McKee UKSC 32 is a case decided by the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom concerning admissibili...

Public-interest immunity

Public-interest immunity, previously known as Crown privilege, is a principle of English common law under which the English courts can grant a court order al...

Real evidence

Physical evidence is any material object that plays some role in the matter that gave rise to the litigation, introduced as evidence in a judicial proceeding...

Rebuttable presumption

Both in common law and in civil law, a rebuttable presumption is an assumption made by a court that is taken to be true unless someone comes forward to conte...

Relevance (law)

Relevance, in the common law of evidence, is the tendency of a given item of evidence to prove or disprove one of the legal elements of the case, or to have ...

Request for admissions

A request for admissions are a set of statements sent from one litigant to an adversary, for the purpose of having the adversary admit or deny the statements...

Reverse onus

A reverse onus clause is a provision within a statute that shifts the burden of proof onto the individual specified to disprove an element of the information...

Search and seizure

Search and Seizure is a procedure used in many civil law and common law legal systems by which police or other authorities and their agents, who, suspecting ...

Section 24 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms

Section 24 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms provides for remedies available to those whose Charter rights are shown to be violated. Some schola...

Self-authenticating document

A self-authenticating document, under the law of evidence in the United States, is any document that can be admitted into evidence at a trial without proof b...

Silent witness rule

The silent witness rule is the use of "substitutions" when referring to sensitive information in the United States open courtroom jury trial system. The phra...